TheFirstFurrow

Wednesday, November 22, 2017 Average Thanksgiving Dinner Cost Decreases

From American Farm Bureau Newsroom

The American Farm Bureau Federation’s Thanksgiving Dinner Price Survey shows diners will enjoy a slightly more affordable Thanksgiving dinner this year. Micheal Clements has more.

Clements: The 32nd annual informal Thanksgiving Dinner Price Survey shows consumers continue to enjoy an affordable food supply as this year’s Thanksgiving dinner is the most affordable in five years. The average cost for 10 for a classic Thanksgiving Dinner decreased less than two percent, remaining under $5 per-person, according to AFBF market intelligence director John Newton.

Newton: The price of Thanksgiving Dinner is $49.12, that’s down 75 cents, or one and a half percent from last year and shows that the Thanksgiving dinner is down for the second consecutive year in a row and remains below five dollars per-person.

Clements: The decline was driven by lower retail turkey prices, along with lower prices for milk and rolls. The average cost of turkey this year is $22.38 for the whole bird.

Newton: Wholesale turkey prices are at their lowest level since 2013, and given that the turkey represents nearly 50 percent of the basket’s total, it’s the biggest factor driving the price decline. Turkey prices came this year in at $1.40 per-pound, that’s down two cents from what we saw last year.

Clements: Meanwhile, the supply of pumpkins for processing for pumpkin pie has rebounded from a couple of years ago.

Newton: The supply of pumpkins this year should be more than adequate. We’ve had favorable growing conditions for two consecutive years in a row in Illinois, where the majority of pumpkins are produced.

Clements: Full survey results are available at www.fb.org. Micheal Clements, Washington.

2016 Thanksgiving Dinner Price Survey: Thanksgiving Dinner Ticks Down to Less Than $5 Per Person

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 18 Factoids About Turkeys

You can fry it, roast it, smoke it, cook it upside-down or even in a bag. But regardless of how you fix it, the centerpiece of most dinner tables this Thanksgiving will be a turkey. We were planning to give a brief history lesson of how turkey became the America’s Thanksgiving staple but apparently it is a matter of much debate, so we’ll steer clear. However, we will take the opportunity to show our appreciation to the hardworking farmers that provide this delicious Thanksgiving centerpiece every year by highlighting the importance of this commodity to our state with some great facts. So this year while shopping for that perfect turkey be sure to think about our turkey producers and maybe share a few of these fun facts around the table.

18 factoids about turkeys

  1. North Carolina ranks second in the nation in turkey production
  2. In 2016, more than 1.2 billion pounds of turkey were produced in NC
  3. Turkey, NC (near Clinton) is one of only three towns in the U.S. named Turkey
  4. 33.5 million turkeys were produced last year in NC
  5. The most turkeys ever produced in NC was in 1992 when farmers raised 62 million turkeys
  6. Last year, the value of turkey production was nearly $1 billion
  7. In 2016, the average American consumed about 16.7 pounds of turkey
  8. Headquartered in Garner, Butterball is the largest producer of turkey products in the U.S.
  9. The male turkey is called a tom and the female turkey is called a hen
  10. The “Turkey Trot” (ballroom dance) was actually named for the short, jerky steps that turkeys take
  11. Turkeys can see in color but not well at night
  12. Turkeys are related to pheasants and lived almost ten million years ago
  13. Turkey consumption more than doubled since 1970
  14. In 2015, turkey was the #4 protein choice for American consumers
  15. Almost 70 percent of U.S. turkey exports go to Mexico
  16. Turkey eggs hatch in 28 days
  17. Turkey is low in fat and has more protein than chicken or beef
  18. A 15 pound turkey usually has about 70 percent white meat and 30 percent dark meat
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 Leader Chosen, Plant Sciences Initiative Poised to Problem-Solve

Written by published on NC State’s CALS News.

The North Carolina Plant Sciences Initiative isn’t all roots and stems.

It’s genetics. It’s robotics. It’s big data.

And with this week’s announcement of a newly hired launch director, it’s about to get rolling — in a big way.

We can make a mark on agriculture for generations to come.

 

Entomologist, agricultural biotechnology business professional and commodity leader Stephen Briggs is now signed on to make this one-of-a-kind plant sciences research enterprise, housed in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University, a reality.

“I believe in our stakeholders’ vision that this can be the Silicon Valley of agriculture for the world,” Briggs said. “We can make a mark on agriculture for generations to come.”

Briggs steps in at a critical time for the interdisciplinary, multi-partner initiative. In less than three years, the NC PSI has transitioned from a “big idea” to a highly anticipated center for plant sciences innovation. With the broad support of North Carolina’s agricultural community, the initiative will break ground on its state-of-the-art facility in 2019, with doors opening in fall 2021.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017 Industry Spotlight: NC Strawberries!

There’s nothing quite like the taste and smell of fresh strawberries to usher in warm weather and blue skies in North Carolina. And we’re right smack in the middle of the strawberry harvest, which typically runs from mid-April through late May, so there’s no better time to head to a local farmers market, roadside stand, or pick-you-own site to scoop up a few buckets. In fact, the NC Strawberry Association has partnered with the NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, NCDA&CS Farmers Markets, and the NC Dairy Promotions Committee to host Strawberry Days at the farmers market. Here are the details:

  • State Farmers Market (Raleigh): Thursday, May 4th from 11am – 1pm
  • Robert G. Shaw Piedmont Triad Farmers Market (Colfax): Friday, May 5th from 11am – 1pm
  • Charlotte Regional Farmers Market (Charlotte): Friday, May 12th from 11am – 1pm

North Carolina is one of the nation’s largest strawberry producers, and unlike other top states, most strawberries grown here are sold here — fresh, flavorful, and juicy. So in honor of one of the most delicious times of year, today we’re going to pay tribute to the North Carolina strawberry industry.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 No Rocket Scientists Needed

The following commentary is by North Carolina Farm Bureau President Larry Wooten.

Immigration reform has been discussed, debated and argued for years, but eventually concludes with the same tired result – “next year is the year!”  To be blunt, fixing our worn-out immigration system does not require a rocket scientist. And this year needs to be the year.

What’s Going on with the Ag Workforce?

The short answer is, it’s changing. When I was still actively farming during the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, most of our farm workers were American citizens. But during the 90s that began to change, and farmers had to react to the change in their labor pool. What was happening over this time is American workers were taking other types of jobs for a number of reasons, but partly because people were becoming more educated and partly because of urbanization. Still needing workers, farmers began hiring more foreign-born workers because they were willing to do the job, and do it well.

Figure 1: In the 1970s, only 2.7 percent of male farmers and farm laborers and 3.8 percent of female farmers and farm laborers were born abroad. Those numbers began to grow considerably during the 1990s, and by 2012 the percentages had ballooned to 26.9 percent.

Another trend farmers have been riding is mechanization. As farm workers have become more difficult to find, many farmers have looked to technology to help them get the job done. And for many farmers, technological advances have been a huge help in addressing workforce shortages.

The problem is that farmers aren’t magicians – eventually they reach a breaking point. And if we aren’t there yet, we’re getting close.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Ray Starling’s White House Appointment and What It Means for Agriculture

First and foremost, congratulations to Ray Starling on being named Special Assistant to the President for Agriculture, Trade and Food Assistance. NC Farm Bureau President Larry Wooten said it best, “This appointment sends a clear message that the White House is serious about addressing the needs of American farmers and rural communities, and I believe Ray Starling has the knowledge, experience, and vision to be a strong advocate for American agriculture.”

Wooten added, “Having grown up on a farm in Eastern North Carolina, Ray has a deep and personal understanding of what our farmers are experiencing and what they need to grow and succeed. Combined with his extensive knowledge of agriculture policy, Ray has proven to be an invaluable asset in supporting farmers and growing North Carolina agriculture.”

Now that he has been appointed, what will he do?

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 Ag Exports are Still Booming

If you’ve watched the news recently, then you’ve probably heard President Trump discuss trade deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) or North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). While we aren’t going to get into the details of either trade deal, we do want to emphasize the importance of agricultural exports to our economic success as a nation and here at home in North Carolina.

Agricultural Exports in the U.S.

To keep it short and sweet, the graphic below demonstrates the importance of agricultural exports to the U.S. economy and lays out several good reasons why there is a great need for a trade deal that works for agriculture. Two key points to pay careful attention to:

  1. The $129.7 billion in total value of U.S. agricultural exports actually surpassed USDA’s forecast
  2. The $1 Trillion in total value of U.S. agricultural exports since 2009 is the strongest period for U.S. ag exports in history

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 Thanksgiving Dinner Ticks Down to Less Than $5 Per Person

From American Farm Bureau Newsroom

The American Farm Bureau Federation’s 31st annual informal price survey of classic items found on the Thanksgiving Day dinner table indicates the average cost of this year’s feast for 10 is $49.87, a 24-cent decrease from last year’s average of $50.11.

The big ticket item – a 16-pound turkey – came in at a total of $22.74 this year. That’s roughly $1.42 per pound, a decrease of 2 cents per pound, or a total of 30 cents per whole turkey, compared to 2015.